William B. Sawyer Jr., the son of Miami pioneer doctor William B. Sawyer. Sawyer operated his father's Mary Elizabeth Hotel at the epicenter of Colored Town in it's heyday. The family still owns considerable properties in Overtown.

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Annie M. Coleman, one of the first women to become involved in social issues as the civil rights era began in Dade county. Coleman was a strong advocate for the rights of Blacks. The Coleman Gardens Housing Project is named after her.
 

 
Horace Sharpe Jr., so of the Lemon City pioneers, in front of one of the first homes built in what became known as Libery City, circa 1923.

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Judge L. E. Thomas, the first Black judge in the South since reconstruction. Judge Thomas presided over the cases brought to court from the city's first Black patrolmen in the late 1940s.

 

 
Thurgood Marshall (second from left) meets with Miami civil rights activists, circa 1952 . Marshall would later become the first Black justice of the Supreme Court. At the time of this photograph he was the general counsel of the National NAACP office. Miami attorney G. E. Graves is seated at far right.

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Martin Luther King Jr. at Miami's Variety Children's Hospital (now Miami Children's Hospital) in 1966. Dr. King visited Miami several times during the civil rights movement.
 

 
Father John E. Culmer (1891-1963). Father Culmer arrived in Miami from Tampa in 1929 to lead St. Agnes Episcopal Church. He became Miami's most influential Black leader in the 1930s and 1940s, regularly writing articles on Miami for national Black publications such as New York City's Amersterdam News.

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